Is your company a statistic? If you operate a family-owned business, the answer may be yes. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, over 50% of all small business owners are aged 50 or older. If you’re included in that group, you might be wrestling with the question of selecting and training a successor. Think you’re too young to retire? Getting an early start helps you avoid “crisis mode” decisions that may damage your company’s future prospects. Early planning also provides opportunities for helping your successor learn the business and get prepared to assume full responsibility.

Here are two initial steps to consider.

  • Choosing a successor. Do you expect a family member — perhaps one of your kids — to take over the company when you’re ready to retire? Be sure to align your company’s best interests with your child’s dreams, skills, knowledge, and passion for success. The decision can be an emotional one, so it makes sense to involve an objective third party such as a financial advisor, attorney, board member, or trusted friend. Be open to considering a long-term employee or an outsider with more extensive experience in your industry.
  • Establish a training plan. Identify the critical functions of the company and provide the opportunity for your chosen successor to gain experience in operations, sales, and accounting. Establish a timetable for training, allow for mistakes, and resist the temptation to override routine decisions. Let your successor develop a management style that fits both the company’s mission and your successor’s temperament.

Succession planning takes time and effort. Give us a call. We are here to help.